Posts tagged “families

Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Photographing LGBT Families, But Were Afraid to Ask

Accompanying a recent Huffington Post article I wrote was a photo of my family, taken by Sara + Ryan Photography.  That one photo resulted in so many terrific comments and queries from readers about the duo’s work, which is primarily focused on LGBT families, that I thought it would be fun to learn more about them and their journey to their photographic specialty.  Both were happy to share how they became straight allies for LGBT equality and to specialize in photographing our unique community.

Given that you are both straight, how did you come to specialize in photographing LGBT families?

Sara: My sister is gay, as well as my best friend, and both have long term partners, but we didn’t necessarily intend to specialize in LGBT families and couples, though we always knew we would be open to it.  With both of these couples, however, we found that neither had ever had professional photos taken, until our sessions with them, as they felt it might be awkward to get pictures taken at a portrait studio.

So they felt more comfortable, given your relationship?

Sara: Yes, because they knew that we were completely comfortable with them being themselves.  After that, we started getting a lot of referrals.  Of course, we still photograph straight families as well, but most of our clientele is now in the LGBT community.

Ryan: We talked to a lot of same-sex couples who’d had previous experiences, where photographers had assured that they had experience photographing same-sex couples, only to feel that the photographer was a bit uneasy during the shoot, whether being uncomfortable personally, or in attempting to pose the couple as a traditional straight couple might be. (more…)


Hey, Rupert Everett, Come Meet Our Kids!

Dear Rupert,

I’ve been a fan of yours since 1984, when I first saw your wonderful film debut in Another Country.  At the time, I was a young gay man and had recently come out to my parents.  I was attempting to find identifiable versions of myself in the larger LGBT world and was using cinema, literature, and the arts as a starting place.  You, as your character was depicted in that film, represented an ideal gay man to me, which I had yet to see, in either real life or reel life.  Your character was everything I aspired to be.  You were smart, droll, handsome, and seemingly secure with your sexuality.  (Plus you got to snog the ever-adorable Cary Elwes, which scored points in my book.)  Call it youthful naiveté, but at that time I assumed that you yourself were much the same as your character, given you continued to live your life off-screen as an out gay man.

But being out doesn’t necessarily mean one is secure, does it, Rupert?  Being out doesn’t necessarily mean that a person feels whole and worthy.  As you and I both know, being out isn’t the same thing as being enlightened.

Your recent quote on gay parenting was a rude awakening for me, making me realize that, all this time, I’d given you far more credit than warranted.  While you may have played the gay father to Madonna’s child in The Next Best Thing (likely leading to endless sessions on the couch with your therapist), does that mean you’re qualified to speak out about LGBT parenting, or any kind of parenting?  Not really, but  here I sit, staring at your quote in the Sunday Times, where you say, “I can’t think of anything worse than being brought up by two gay dads.”  Given the lives we’ve both led, I can’t help but think, “Really, Rupert?  WTF?”

In all of the world’s endless possibilities, Rupert, you can’t imagine anything worse than a child being raised by gay men?

How about a child being born to a father who is in jail for attempted murder?  Whose mother sees fit to pierce the ears of her then 6-month-old son, but cannot find the time to fix his club feet?  Who later takes this same son to a crack house, which is then raided by police, leading to a year and a half of foster care? (more…)