Right On Target

I confess — I bought something at Target recently. I know, I know — I’m a really bad gay! But, if it helps, I feel truly awful about it.

For those not “in the know”, many of us in the LGBT community have been boycotting Tar-jay ever since they stupidly made at $150k donation to a PAC, MN Forward. In turn, the PAC used that money to run ads for gubernatorial candidate Tom Emmer, an anti-gay, anti-choice conservative. Ironically, his democratic opponent was now-Governor Mark Dayton, whose family founded Target.

And in the many months since, Target has refused to alter their ways or apologize, instead saying that they were taking a “closer look” at their donation policies.  Which is corporate-speak for “nothing to see here.”

But now I’ve gone and bought a pair of cheap sunglasses, and feel really shitty about it.

Those that know me know how politically aware I am, and how much effort I put towards social change.  So why would I ignore my own values and sleep with the enemy?

Well, that enemy used to be a former lover of mine.

For many years, my week would not be complete without a trip to Target, and each trip usually saw me spending about a hundred bucks or more.  I bought everything there, from clothes to toys to food to sundries.  I loved the clean, sharp look of the Target stores and merchandise, and genuinely could not wait to get into the store to spend money.  Plus, when you’ve got two kids and are living on a budget, there aren’t a lot of easy, cheap shopping options — especially when I won’t shop WalMart.

While I rationally told myself, as I entered my former lover’s home, that what I would now spend was a mere fraction of past excursions, does it really matter how much I spent?  Just my being in the store was an implicit way of saying “Well, you’re not that bad.”  But you are bad, Target–you are very, very bad.

Giving political donations to those who would limit rights from LGBT folks, especially when your corporation is explicitly targeting that same gay community for retail dollars, is blatant hypocrisy.

Later, Marcus saw the shopping bag and said, “Wait, Daddy–we’re not supposed to shop at Target!  Remember?  We can’t shop there anymore, until they apologize!”

Our nine year-old son is wiser than I am.

No more Target:  no way, no how.

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